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When people ask me for advice on how to brand themselves, I sometimes suggest they watch reality TV.  I know… odd right? But a show like Married at First Sight makes it easy to illustrate a few points because I’ve found this show to be more open and authentic than other reality TV shows. If you’re in the process of building your own brand, this exercise can help.

Instead of focusing on what’s working or not with your own brand, detach a bit and pretend you’ve been asked to craft a new brand for one or two of the people you see on the show. After watching about 3-4 episodes and reading through the #MarriedAtFirstSight Twitter feed, ask yourself a few questions about the people you’ve seen:

  • Of all the people I’ve seen on the show, which ones really intrigue me and why?
  • What are they most passionate about?
  • How would I like to interact with them? TV, Internet, Radio, Print, Podcast, Blog, Live Interaction, Talk Show?
  • Do you find this person to be natural, friendly and open in front of the camera?
  • Can you get a sense of who they really are?
  • When are they the most open? The most guarded?
  • When do they light up?
  • I get a sense that they know a lot about ______.
  • What other companies would I pair them up with?
  • Who would I continue to follow on social media after the show ends?
  • Who really causes me to have a strong reaction, whether angry, sad, happy, thoughtful, etc.?

By simply watching the show and asking these types of questions, you can really predict who has an exciting brand waiting to unfold, and who might fade into the background after a few interviews. But that’s not all – the answers to questions like the ones above have far-reaching impact. Using questions like these, I have developed:

  • new marketing and sales goals
  • eCommerce sites
  • media kits and outreach plans
  • product launches
  • compelling show concepts
  • speakers platforms
  • intriguing blog, webisode, workshop/classroom and book content
  • image and style blueprints
  • studio/set designs
  • identification and contact strategies for the best networks and partner brands/companies
  • brand clarification strategies
  • networking opportunities, etc.

So… now let’s get back to your brand…

This mini-exercise provides a few things to get your brain moving – but admittedly it’s sometimes difficult to do a proper for your own brand. Here’s where I’d suggest getting an outside party or focus group together to do an evaluation for you using whatever content or concept you’ve created so far. I think it’s important to have a new perspective, so finding a professional or unbiased analyst is ideal. If you have some followers, use your Twitter, Google or Facebook analytics data to get a sense of which content you produce that people resonate with.

Cheers!

Lise